Parish Players

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

Wed 20th February to Sat 23rd February 2019

The Sound of Music

Read-throughs, Auditions and Casting - Autumn 2018:

After their long summer break, the Olveston Parish Players are excited to be gathering once more to begin work on their next production, ‘The Sound of Music’, which will take place on Wednesday 20th to Saturday 23rd February 2019 at the Parish Hall in Tockington.

New members are very welcome, especially those with a love of singing. If you (adults and children) would like the chance to take part, you need to come to the two read-through evenings on Monday 24th and Thursday 27th September at 7.30pm in the Parish Hall, Tockington. This will be an opportunity to get to know other members of the company, to read through the script and to sing the songs! Audition parts will be handed out during these sessions.

There will then be a children-only evening on Monday 1st October (see below for details). Auditions for adults and children will take place on Thursday 4th October starting at the earlier time of 7.00pm. Rehearsals will run on Mondays and Thursdays from Monday 8th October.

Extra information for children

Crucial to the success of the production will be the casting of a team of enthusiastic and talented youngsters to play the seven Von Trapp children. Anyone who auditions must be able to dance and sing, as well as to learn their lines. You must also be able to commit to attending rehearsals on Monday and Thursday evenings from September through to February (as required by the rehearsal schedule). There will be breaks for school holidays.

Children should come to the read-throughs on 24th and 27th September, along with the adults. Then on Monday 1st October at 7.30pm there will be a children-only evening to create a short list, looking at their relative heights. The children’s auditions will be with the adults on Thursday 4th October at 7.00pm.

Casting will be determined by order of height - but as a guide, we are looking for children of these approximate ages: Gretl (aged 5 or 6), Marta (aged 7), Brigitta (aged 9), Kurt (aged 10), Louisa (aged 13), Friedrich (aged 14), Liesl (aged 16)

A masterpiece by Rodgers & Hammerstein

Possibly the most well-known of musicals, ‘The Sound of Music’ first hit the Broadway stage in 1959 and starred Mary Martin, well before it became a film in 1965 with Julie Andrews cast in the leading role. It tells the true story of the von Trapp family, who escaped the Nazis to become the famous Trapp Family Singers in the USA.

Now, 60 years after ‘The Sound of Music’ first opened, the Parish Players are set to make this production their own in their inimitable style. Make sure you don’t miss it and save the dates in your diary. Tickets will go on sale in January.

To find out more, see www.facebook.com/OlvestonParishPlayers or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

THE WIZARD OF OZ

 

Wed 14th February to Sat 17th February 2018

We hope you enjoyed our recent production!   Read the review below...

Wizard of Oz poster

 

 Review of 'The Wizard of Oz' - by Barbie Davies

The Parish Players' production of ‘The Wizard of Oz’ certainly went with a whizz. A cracking pace was set by experienced director Linda Evans, musical director Chloe Allsopp-Jones and their well disciplined team of cast and crew!

 Wizard of Oz cast

This show was everything an audience might hope for in a performance of the much-loved classic. Nowadays, audiences constantly compare amateur shows to professional productions and, of course, the film itself. Has Judy Garland got a childhood double? Not only was Isobel Lambie outstandingly professional and totally charming, but she looked bewitchingly like the original Dorothy. Comparisons here did not disappoint.

Nor did they with David Proud's wonderfully athletic and winning Scarecrow, Paul Dimery's heartfelt happy rendering of Tin Man, and Ray Hale's cuddly, comic and convincing Lion. And what music they all made – as did the whole cast, of which the majority were very talented and committed children who delighted us, not only with their acting and dancing skills, but with their genuine enthusiasm and total immersion in the plot and characters. No wonder they held the audience's attention so very well.

The whole production oozed joie de vivre and colour, whether from the truly picture book set created by Andy Black and his team, the rainbow lighting from Richard Churchill, or the glorious array of costumes from vibrant stripy socks of the munchkins to skeletons or beautiful classical ballerinas – all carefully co-ordinated by Cath Chappel. In the very capable hands of the Jones family, the accompaniments to the well-loved songs bounced along and sensitively encouraged both chorus and soloists.

There were many moments on stage made memorable by a perfect blend of visual effects, emotional sincerity and acting or dancing skills. In particular, the snow scene was a real triumph with ample snow falling against a midnight sky and ballet (including some lovely pointe work) choreographed by Jill Harris and danced most sensitively by the young ballerinas clad classically in white.

Comedy too was crisp, lively and inventive. The shrinking of Amy Sunderland, the wonderfully wicked witch, was a hoot. Half way through the process, one of the children became the escaped half-shrunk witch who had to be chased round the hall and back into the magnificent cauldron. The wizard himself, played by Richard Newley, made a very amusing eccentric.

Between them the kindly good witch and Linda Evans waved a magic wand across the whole production which was absolute magic; and not in the West End or at the end of the Rainbow, but in tiny Tockington.

* The reviewer saw Isobel Lambie play Dorothy on Saturday 17th February. On alternate nights, Dorothy was played by Aggie Barnes - to great acclaim!


  

 

PETER PAN - February 2017

Peter Pan poster
 

 

The Parish Players' February 2017 production of Peter Pan was terrific fun - a great community endeavour!

Here's Barbie Davies' review of the production:

 

Peter Pan - What makes folks fly?

In this busy world, everyone likes a dose of Never Never Land. The Parish Players, in their musical version of ‘Peter Pan’ took us there by means of the set, stage and technical crews’ ingenious flying mechanism, dream-like sets, lighting and effects. They are indeed a dream team of imagination and efficiency.  Whilst the melodies of this version of the original 1904 play by J.M. Barrie might not be the most interesting, Chloe Allsopp-Jones’ quartet brought the excellent arrangements to life with their expert verve and sensitivity. They gave wonderful support to everyone on stage which resulted in confident and heart-felt singing. 

Linda Evans’ experienced hand gave all the performers a real sense of the pantomime flavour, much panache, and a discipline which translated into a slick and infectiously enthusiastic production.  Sheer energy, attack and a sense of fun oozed from every performer. The hard-working chorus of Pirates/Red Indians really entered into the spirit of each caricature, providing some very amusing moments, especially in the hands of Ray Hale and Richard Newley.  All the lost boys were an absolute delight with their total commitment to their parts, their fabulous facial expressions and wonderful singing. What talent there is for the future! 

On the last night, after an arduous week, Niamh McBride still strong and crystal clear as Wendy, perfectly captured the ‘perfect little mother’ adopting just the right amount of tongue in cheek capabilities – and what a super singing voice! Hannah Clarke was a very convincing John – no mean feat for this generous young performer. Theo Woodward made a very winning Michael by his obvious love of the part, while Peter Pan himself was beautifully played by Jake Woodward, who captured the freedom and joie de vivre of the role. He too had a really strong and tuneful voice. Evie Snadden delivered the difficult role of nearly good fairy, Tinkerbell, with real grace, mischief and perfect timing.

Of course every pantomime has its baddies. Phil Savage’s Captain Hook had the perfect balance of silliness and glory in the gory. His arch-enemy (a most sleek crocodile) made many a swift slither across the stage causing many a giggle. Only Nana the nurse dog rivalled him, affectionately played by David Proud. No wonder Mrs Darling, warmly performed by Lesley Clarke, was grateful for Nana’s help at that amusing moment when she and her husband (Phil Savage, after a quick change) stand surrounded by the boys who no longer want to be lost, but adopted by the Darlings.

The Parish Hall may only have a small stage (plus, on this occasion, a useful fore stage) but the impact is always big: whether in dance work (choreographed by Jill Harris), the colourful costumes by Cath Chappel, Felicity Hemmett and Helen Leicester, or the sense of magic which is created when a community works together. That’s what makes folk really fly!

Director’s note: This review was from Saturday 18th February. On alternate evenings, the roles of Peter and Tinkerbell were played memorably by Timothy Mitchell and Isobel Lambie.

 

 

 

The Parish Players currently

New members are very welcome. If interested, please get in touch.  Enquiries to Director Linda Evans (413887).

The Parish Players have a Facebook site, where you can see lots of photos from recent productions.

If you're interested in reading the Constitution of the Parish Players, you can read it here

 

 

 

 

Parish Players production of Oklahoma

Photos of Past Productions

 

  • Even more photos of all recent productions can be seen on our Facebook page.  

 

  • You might also like to check us out on Youtube, where we have a very well supported presence.

 

History of the Parish Players 

The eventful life of the Parish Players began in the 1960s, as a drama group in the Olveston and Tockington WI, winning awards in various thespian competitions and writing their own material with considerable success - such as the spectacular ‘Pageant for Queens' to celebrate the Queen's Silver Jubilee in 1977. Perhaps the most striking event was in 1980 when they took part in a festival of entertainment at the Colston Hall, winning the Avon County competition of Scene 80. As time passed and members left the district and so on, a few men were co-opted to join the team and so was born the Company which became known as the Parish Players. Their first production was an old time music hall written and devised by talented members of the community. The Show seemed to strike a chord and the company was encouraged to present a similar format every year, following different themes with exciting results. By now the players were backed by a hardworking team of enthusiasts backstage.  The rush to buy tickets every year almost became an embarrassment, with two or three days booked solid within hours of the box office opening.

By the year 2000 however, it was becoming difficult to find authors. A millennium play ‘Marking Time', written by Beryl Keay, presented at St Mary's Church, became an inspiration for the Director, Linda Evans, and the Parish Players who appeared in it, to introduce a professionally scripted performance and a production of the ‘Mikado' under the baton of Dr David Shaw received critical acclaim. Once launched in this new concept, an annual show of contrasting styles has materialised ever since. ‘The Pirates of Penzance', ‘The Merry Widow', ‘South Pacific', ‘Guys and Dolls', ‘Fiddler on the Roof', ‘White Horse Inn', ‘My Fair Lady', 'Oklahoma!', 'The Gondoliers', 'Carousel', 'Me and My Girl', 'The King and I' and 'Hello Dolly' have now established the Company as an experienced, dedicated group in all aspects, willing to take on almost anything!

 

Parish Players production of My Fair Lady